Personal Branding Portraits for Wedding Photographer, David Weightman

Personal Branding Portraits for Wedding Photographer, David Weightman

Personal Branding Portraits for Wedding Photographer, David Weightman

I love doing environmental portraits, although it’s slightly nerve-racking when they’re for another photographer! David had recently had a website redesign and needed some new personal branding portraits for his About Me page.

The images had to work on both mobiles and computers and David wanted something fairly relaxed and informal and not too posed; with this in mind, I scouted some locations ahead of the day so that we’d have a good choice of backgrounds to work with that would also complement the final images. The good thing about Guildford is that there are so many places to choose from, including beautiful tree-lined paths, lovely old brick walls and lots of more urban settings.

The only thing now was to wait for some good weather. We had a couple of dates in mind, but the first one turned out grey and damp, which wouldn’t have worked at all well. As it was late autumn, I really wanted a bright, sunny day (something I usually avoid like the plague!), because I knew that the low light would be perfect for enhancing the colours of the trees. Our second choice was perfect – clear blue skies, but freezing cold too!

We covered about six locations in all and I captured lots of different poses and expressions. David was very patient as I dragged him halfway across Guildford! These are some from his shortlist, and the first shot (which was actually the last one I took) was the one he chose for his About Me page; it’s my favourite too.

If you’d like to see more of David’s amazing documentary-style wedding photography, or if you’d like to book him for your wedding, visit his website here – https://www.marriedtomycamera.com/

And if you’d like to update your own business portraits, then email me at anna@annasaverimuttu.co.uk.

494 – Creating Your Internal Personal Branding Kit for Scalability

Hey, what’s going on? Welcome to episode 494 of The 7 Minute Mentor with me, Mark Asquith. And today we’re going to finish off on this visual identity, this visual branding theme for the week. And we’re going to do that by talking about creating your internal personal brand kit for scalability, and we’re going to talk about that in just one moment.

But, look. Just a quick reminder that I will be live, of course I will. 4 p.m. UK, 11 a.m. Eastern, 8 a.m. Pacific, today with my free coaching session. Which means that if you’ve got a problem in your business or in your life in business, I want to help. And that’s why I give away 30 minutes of my time, completely for free, every single week. So come and join the session. Tell me what you’re struggling with. There’s a nice, quick submission form over on my website where you can tell me what you’re dealing with, what you’re struggling with, and I’ll add it to the list of things to talk about. So, if you want to join the session, if you want to grab a hand from me on anything, all you need to do is head to Excellence-Expected.com/freecoaching.

Also, do not forget that the team at AWeber, my great friends, Eric, Tom, Jake, Brandon and the rest of the team, like Chris, over there at AWeber are giving you 90 days to build your email list for free. This is 90 days on them. Why? Because email marketing has to be at the centre of everything that you do. It’s at the centre of everything that I do. It’s at the centre of everything that your favourite online marketers do. Believe me, it is core to everything. So I want you to get involved and build revenue from your email list. And you can do that for free for 90 days, completely risk free at Excellence-Expected.com/AWeber.

Now that you know how to get your brand designed and delivered, it’s time to discuss how to implement that for simple and powerful scalability, both for now and in the future. Now, the key to this is something called your brand guidelines document. Now your designer … This is why you need to spend some decent cash and invest some money in your brand from day one because rather than just getting a logo off Fiver, if you work with a designer that understands brand, you will be given some brand guidelines. Now, we’ve got some. You can go and check these out, PodcastSuccessAcademy.com. Go and check out the workshop with Ross Davies, which is about branding. Sorry, Kyle Wilkinson, my bad. Kyle Wilkinson. Ross Davies does have the same resource though, that’s why I got confused. So go and check out the Kyle Wilkinson workshop and there’s an example of our brand guidelines there.

Now what these guidelines do is they’re essentially a do and don’t system. You will not ever use the logo in a skewed or distorted format. You will not ever use any colors that aren’t in the palette set out in your brand guidelines. You will not ever use a font or typeface that is not in those brand guidelines. Because what happens is that most people generate their logo and they don’t have any guidance on how to use it. So they don’t know what color scheme to use, they don’t know what text and what typography and fonts to use. So when they go and create something like a flier or a leaflet or a promo online for something, what they do is simply nothing. They don’t have any consistency, they’ll just piecemeal something together and everything that they do looks different. And that is where your brand fails. There is no consistency. And a lot of people will say to us at Podcast Websites or via the Academy, “How does your stuff look so good? How can you create something that looks so good so quickly?” And it’s because we have these brand guidelines. And it’s all about creating a brand kit.

So what I mean by that is, you have to have from your designer your logo in black, in white, in full color if it’s a color logo. You’ve got to have it inline where it’s running in a landscape format. You’ve got to have it, if it’s got an identity, like a little stamp, it’s got to be, you’ve got to have a stacked version of it where it’s above the text. You’ve got to have it in EPS format, in PNG format, in JPEG format. You’ve got to have your color palette set up. You’ve got to know what your hex colors are for your gray. Our gray is 333333. We’ve gone orange. Our orange, I’ll actually bring this up for you if I can find it. Our orange is F0612F. We’ll never use a different orange. The Academy red is EB212E. We will never use anything else. Our Academy green is 77C836. We’ll never use a different green. And that is our brand kit. So it means that anyone in the organization, I can say to them, “Look guys. Go and design a Canva layout for Facebook and use all our elements.” Our font is Railway, and the body font is always Open Sans.

So everything will become consistent and then your brand guidelines, your internal brand kit, will then talk about spacing. Your logo can never be placed closer to the edge of a document than the width of the logo itself, or than a third of the logo. So if your logo is 300 pixels wide, you should never place your logo closer than 100 pixels to the left or to the bottom of an image. And it gives you that consistency right across the board. Brand guidelines and creating your personal brand kit. Honestly, it’s vital. You might think, “Well, I don’t need to do that ’cause it’s only me using it. Or I’ll just wing it.” It will look crap if you wing it. It will look terrible. It will … I know so many people and people that I work with even now who don’t do this, they’ve got no brand kit, so everything looks bad. Or everything just doesn’t look as good as it could.

And I don’t want you to be one of those people. And working with the right designer and investing that 700 bucks upwards, is going to give you a brand identity that comes with some brand guidelines. So I want you to do that, I want you to start thinking about that. If you need some examples, go and check out PodcastSuccessAcademy.com. Scroll to the workshop with Kyle Wilkinson in the workshops section, and just go ahead and download our brand guidelines. Our brand guidelines.

So, listen. Come and join me on the free coaching. We can talk about this. If I don’t see you on the free coaching, I hope this week’s really, really helped you. Getting your visual side of your personal brand right is important. It’s very important. You can’t do it cheaply, you have to spend a little bit of money on it, you’ve got to spend a little bit of time on it. But if you do this, I promise you, all these lessons we’ve learned this week, they will serve you well. It means you will never need to change your personal brand. And if you do, it just means it’s going to be an upgrade for the right reasons because you’ve developed, not because it’s not serving you anymore. So please heed these lessons. Come and see me on the free coaching at 4 p.m. UK, 11 a.m. Eastern, 8 a.m. Pacific at Excellence-Expected.com/freecoaching.

I’ll see you next week, and please, never ever forget the more you expect from yourself, the more you will excel.

The post 494 – Creating Your Internal Personal Branding Kit for Scalability appeared first on Excellence Expected, by Mark Asquith.

4 Personal Branding Mistakes I Learned From

Personal branding is a hot topic right now and even though this is the way that business has been conducted forever, I remember walking to the butcher’s with my Grandad 30 years ago because he wouldn’t buy his Sunday roast from anyone else, many people are considering this to be a ‘new’ way of marketing.

And I get that, I do. It’s a departure from the “” split that many of us were brought up with.

I do think that sometimes though because this is termed as a new way to do business and to do marketing, that some people believe that in order to be a successful personal brand they have to be overly themselves.

You know the kind of thing, people being over divisive for no reason; acting as if they invented well, everything; calling people out and being generally a little dickwaddy towards people working ‘the 9 to 5‘ and just really acting in a way that will never generate trust or likability amongst prospects or peers.

Ultimately, that’s the whole point of personal branding isn’t it: to be liked.

But importantly, the distinction is that we need to be liked by and attract our people. Not just anyone.

In fact, we need to be using personal branding and opinion marketing in order to filter out those who we really will never get along with – those who simply share different viewpoints – and to connect with those who will become our friends, advocates and community.

THAT is why personal branding is receiving so much attention right now because it’s a really simple way for non-marketers to understand inbound marketing.

Here’s how my friends at HubSpot define inbound marketing:

Inbound marketing is about creating valuable experiences that have a positive impact on people and your business. How do you do that? You attract prospects and customers to your website and blog through relevant and helpful content. Once they arrive, you engage with them using conversational tools like email and chat and by promising continued value. And finally, you delight them by continuing to act as an empathetic advisor and expert.

Unlike outbound marketing, with inbound marketing, you don’t need to fight for your potential customers’ attention. By creating content designed to address the problems and needs of your ideal customers, you attract qualified prospects and build trust and credibility for your business.

What’s the one word at the centre of that entire definition?

“You”.

I’ve spent a few years building my personal brand and using it as a way to tell the story of my business.

This is something that I’ll be leaning into even more over the coming months as I unveil the upgrade of my personal brand and go behind the scenes of running a tech business that has transformed over the last 12 months.

As I’ve built my personal brand, I’ve spent time some time working with others on their personal brand as a passion project and without doubt, I have spotted a series of recurring problems that people face when building a personal brand based business.

Here they are – they’re all mistakes I’ve made too, and that I’ve learned from.

Personal branding mistake no. 1: Switching focus

This is something that I struggled with when it came to my personal brand.

It’s taken me a long time to realise that I don’t want to be an online entrepreneur, I’m focussed on building a tech business.

Because of this, I really struggled with where I fit into that online entrepreneur space – what do I teach people to do?

Well, honestly I teach them how to survive, thrive and grow whilst building a business that starts with them and grows beyond them.

I teach people how to break out of their lifestyle prison.

So many personally branded solo businesses switch focus too much, especially if they have an idea that doesn’t instantly “work”.

You have to stay the course. Sure, you may need to tweak or add/remove from your offer. Of course, you might need to change tactics from time to time to make sure you’re constantly optimising what works, but you have to stay very, very clear on your message.

Be sure: what do you help people to do?

Personal branding mistake no. 2: Lacking consistency

The single biggest issue that I see failing businesses, both offline and online, making is that they are simply not consistent with anything for any length of time.

Whether that’s content creation, internal processes or measuring core metrics – things fall by the wayside because staying consistent is hard.

You have to write when you don’t feel like writing. You have to record when you don’t feel like recording. You have to sell when the last thing you want to do is sell.

You have to be so consistent that your prospects, customers, community and friends can easily rely upon you being “there” when you say you’ll be there.

My free coaching, for example, runs every single Friday.

Every single week with the exception of one week holiday per year, I turn up whether I feel like being “on” or not, and I provide value.

Sometimes all I want to do is go home after a hard week, but I made a promise and I deliver upon it.

What have you promised? And what are you delivering?

Personal branding mistake no. 3: Cheap design is the father of failure

Controversial, I know, but in the age of Fiverr and 99 Designs design has become commoditised.

You don’t need to spend a fortune, but you need to invest in the right person to work with on your design.

Often as a business with a personal slant, you can invest a little in the right direction early on with a view to investing a little more as you gain more success.

The point is that just like Tinder, your face matters. And your face is your logo, your colour palette, your tone of voice, your use of whitespace, your choice of photographs and so many other subtleties that only a designer who understands you will be able to fully realise.

Yes, of course, it sounds shallow, but you chose to spend your life with your partner because you were attracted to them in the first case.

People will choose to spend their time with you because they’re attracted to how you make them feel, and what people instantly see from you amongst the masses of other social distractions and entrepreneurial content will inform that very first decision on whether to court you or not.

Find a local designer, get to know them and build a relationship with them.

I use Killer Ky.

Personal branding mistake no. 4: No conversation with your people!

Every single week I receive questions to my free coaching session and without a doubt, every single week, I receive at least one question that goes like this:

Mark, how do I increase engagement within my email list?

So I delve a little deeper with the person asking and inevitably it transpires that they’re making one of two simple mistakes, often both:

  1. They simply aren’t asking people to engage. Instead, they’re sending one-way, ‘outbound’ style emails that are intended to sell their services. Rather than informing or helping and then simply asking people to reply to the email, they’re hammering a ‘sale’ and making the recipient feel like they’re being sold to. That’s ok for certain emails, but no way will it work when trying to build an engaged audience.
  2. They’re ‘too busy’ to reply to emails. Ok, I get it, you get a lot of emails. But you can’t have it both ways – if you want people to engage with you, then you have to engage with them in return. But more than that, you have to want to get to know the person emailing you and take a genuine interest in what they need. A conversation is the easiest thing to start with a respondent and by making people feel like they matter to you, you’ll build super-fans quickly.

Bonus personal branding mistake no. 5: Don’t be a tool, just because you have an Internet connection

Look, personal branding is about having an opinion, I truly believe that.

But there’s a big trend at the moment of people, especially amongst men of simply being rude, mean and sometimes even nasty to people who have a differing opinion to themselves.

“Authenticity” means being transparently you, helping people and asking for nothing in return.

What it does not mean is bringing people down, making them feel bad about themselves or using a platform to publicly deride someone.

I drop the odd “F-bomb” and make no apology for it. Gary Vee is the most outspoken person I know.

We live in a world where it’s ok to be yourself, please don’t confuse that with being a tool.

What next?

Well, I don’t teach people how to build a personal brand right now, I’m not an ‘online entrepreneur’, I’m a tech founder and that’s my focus.

But, I have to build my personal brand in order to tell the stories that I want to tell from that world and so I’ll continue to share my learnings.

As a next step, I’d recommend checking out my “behind the scenes” podcast, and I also recommend that you pick up by my friend Chris Ducker.

Remember, the more you expect from yourself, the more you WILL excel!

About the author, Mark

Mark Asquith is a serial entrepreneur who has built globally successful design, marketing, software and digital businesses since he quit his real job in 2005.

A passionate podcaster, global keynote speaker and helpful bloke, Mark is the co-founder of Podcast Websites and the creator of Excellence Expected. He has a terribly embarrassing beard.

  • Links:

Brand Yourself – Niko Neugebauer

Brace Yourself!
Almost everyone will tell you that you have got to Brand Yourself!
But ain’t nobody’s telling about HOW TO actually brand yourself. Or why, for that matter. 🙂

In the past 2 years I have started feeling very strongly the impact of wearing anyone’s brand (any company).
Its about the way people treat you, talk to you and ultimately think of you.
I have grown tired of getting to know people and receiving comentaries, such as – Oh you work for company X, or you attended event Y, or “you must be one of those programmers who put any stickers on their laptops, right?” – the last one is a real phrase I have heard just last week.

Here is my extremely unpopular opinion:
If you have certification, title or award name as a part of your name (Looking at tradition of some certain European country), if on the social networks you are not just John Doe but Dr. Certified Braindump Nobel Nominated John Doe, then my honest advice is to spend some time thinking – what you are actually doing and how do you brand yourself.
Think about the long term, think about the future generations. Think about how you want to get known. Think about who do you work for!

I strongly believe in the brands (well, the real brands – the ones that try to improve the world, not the ones that just market, present and resell acquired products, instead of producing themselves), but there will be virtually no person working for their whole life for the very same company. And I hope that there will not be a single person who will agree with every single thing that their employer company is doing.
That’s one of my core’s beliefs.

And that’s why, I decided to give away almost every branded material away (there are always so many people who need it and who will appreciate it), and introduce my own brand. Over the course of the last couple of months I have spend enough time thinking and here is my own brand, that I have created for myself – Niko Neugebauer:
It is rather simple with 2 letters “N” and while the lower one is shifting forward as in “adjusting to the change”, it forms a lightning bolt between the N letters. Since the childhood I was always fascinated with the lightnings and always painted one as my personal symbol, as a signature. Now it is a part of my brand, the one that I can wear because the only person responsible for it is myself.
This is hopefully the only brand that will be accompanying me in the future, or at least I will strive very hardly for it to be the only one, and while during the events I will wear your event’s identification, that is the line that I am not intending to cross once I am not a presenter at your event anymore.

I honestly wish everyone to have and use their own brand, representing & being responsible for themselves in the first place. Well, like an adult person is supposed to behave 😉

This Personal Branding Expert Says The Secret To Success Is Being Authentically You

Photo credit: Getty

Hundreds of questions came in during the Forbes webinar I recently delivered with Forbes’ social media expert Kimberly Horner. If you missed it, here’s where you can access the replay.

Kim and I answered a few of the questions that came in, but there were many, many more. The most prominent theme among all the questions that were submitted was digital branding – and that’s good because the future of personal branding has moved online.

In this post, I share my responses to some of the most common questions from the webinar’s participants:

1. Should I write my LinkedIn Summary in the first- or third-person?

This is a common question because we are so used to bios written in the third-person, but first-person bios have started making their appearance on LinkedIn. My recommendation is first- person for two reasons.

First, – pretending it’s your publicist who penned it. It’s more authentic and transparent to write it using “I” instead of “he” or “she.”

Second, when you write in the first-person, you set up a conversation between you and the reader – it’s much more personal than talking about a third party. This allows you to build an emotional connection with those who are checking you out.

2. When I do a Google search, I rarely show up in the first few pages. What do I do if I have a common name?

OK, so maybe your parents named you Jill Smith. And maybe there at 10,000 other Jill Smiths in the world – and sadly, your Google results show up mixed in with theirs – or worse, your results are nowhere to be found on the first few pages of results. There’s no need to worry! Here’s the good news: People have become really sophisticated searchers. They realize when they see mixed-up results like this that they need to do something to filter out all the other Jill Smiths so they can find you. What they’ll do is add to your name some keywords to filter out the non-you results. The question for you is: What are those keywords? You need to know the words people would use to try to find you, and you must include those words in everything you post online.

3. Should I blog on LinkedIn?

The short answer is Yes. That is of course if you have an area of expertise, along with your own point of view. LinkedIn provides access to over 500 million pair of eyeballs – making it easier to get your content seen than if you tried to maintain your own blog. If you are going to share your thought-leadership on LinkedIn … pay attention to these imperatives:

  1. Write for your target audience. Make sure you know who you’re seeking to influence, and then position your content for relevance to that community. Personal branding is about being selectively famous – ever visible to those who are making decisions about you.
  2. Only publish a blog if the answer to this question is yes, absolutely: Will this be value to the people I seek to influence? Personal branding is about giving value to others. It’s about generosity and acknowledgement.
  3. Write consistently. Publishing one blog post a year is much less valuable than having a regular series of posts that your community comes to expect. One of the three Cs of personal branding is constancy – it means consistently appearing in your target audience’s line of sight. “Regular” does not mean daily or even weekly. You can write one blog every month and still have a lot of impact.

4. There are so many LinkedIn profiles for people with my title, how can I differentiate mine? 

Visual elements are just as important as the words in your message. Here are the keys for using both to stand out from the herd:

  • Create a custom background that expresses your brand or a color that exudes your brand attributes.
  • Add multimedia – images, videos, presentation PDFs and/or infographics – to the Summary and Experience sections of your profile
  • Update your headline to include not only your job title and company but also your promise – the results you deliver when you do what you do
  • Write a summary that’s one of a kind – including your passions and values. Give people who are checking you out an opportunity to get to know you beyond the accomplishments and credentials.

5. How can I use video to express my brand?

There are so many ways video can help you exude your brand. First, let’s talk about the power of video. Video allows you to deliver a complete communication. Words – and that’s all you have in a blog – account for just 7 percent of whether a communicator is likable, according to research by Albert Mehrabian. Videos posted to YouTube are also very helpful for getting you noticed. – thanks to Universal search. To get the most personal branding bang from video, do this:

  • Make your video deliver value in 3 minutes or fewer.
  • Publish your video to YouTube using all the right keywords.
  • Publish your video using the update feature in LinkedIn.
  • Add relevant videos to the Summary or Experience sections of your LinkedIn profile.
  • Publicize your video by sharing it with your connections and via all relevant groups.

Delivering this webinar with Kim was a lot of fun – and the especially fun part was seeing how many career-minded professionals are investing time in their growth.

William Arruda is the cofounder of CareerBlast and creator of the complete LinkedIn quiz that helps you evaluate your LinkedIn profile and networking strategy.

‘>

Hundreds of questions came in during the Forbes webinar I recently delivered with Forbes’ social media expert Kimberly Horner. If you missed it, here’s where you can access the replay.

Kim and I answered a few of the questions that came in, but there were many, many more. The most prominent theme among all the questions that were submitted was digital branding – and that’s good because the future of personal branding has moved online.

In this post, I share my responses to some of the most common questions from the webinar’s participants:

1. Should I write my LinkedIn Summary in the first- or third-person?

This is a common question because we are so used to bios written in the third-person, but first-person bios have started making their appearance on LinkedIn. My recommendation is first- person for two reasons.

Second, when you write in the first-person, you set up a conversation between you and the reader – it’s much more personal than talking about a third party. This allows you to build an emotional connection with those who are checking you out.

2. When I do a Google search, I rarely show up in the first few pages. What do I do if I have a common name?

OK, so maybe your parents named you Jill Smith. And maybe there at 10,000 other Jill Smiths in the world – and sadly, your Google results show up mixed in with theirs – or worse, your results are nowhere to be found on the first few pages of results. There’s no need to worry! Here’s the good news: People have become really sophisticated searchers. They realize when they see mixed-up results like this that they need to do something to filter out all the other Jill Smiths so they can find you. What they’ll do is add to your name some keywords to filter out the non-you results. The question for you is: What are those keywords? You need to know the words people would use to try to find you, and you must include those words in everything you post online.

3. Should I blog on LinkedIn?

The short answer is Yes. That is of course if you have an area of expertise, along with your own point of view. LinkedIn provides access to over 500 million pair of eyeballs – making it easier to get your content seen than if you tried to maintain your own blog. If you are going to share your thought-leadership on LinkedIn … pay attention to these imperatives:

  1. Write for your target audience. Make sure you know who you’re seeking to influence, and then position your content for relevance to that community. Personal branding is about being selectively famous – ever visible to those who are making decisions about you.
  2. Only publish a blog if the answer to this question is yes, absolutely: Will this be value to the people I seek to influence? Personal branding is about giving value to others. It’s about generosity and acknowledgement.
  3. Write consistently. Publishing one blog post a year is much less valuable than having a regular series of posts that your community comes to expect. One of the three Cs of personal branding is constancy – it means consistently appearing in your target audience’s line of sight. “Regular” does not mean daily or even weekly. You can write one blog every month and still have a lot of impact.

4. There are so many LinkedIn profiles for people with my title, how can I differentiate mine?

Visual elements are just as important as the words in your message. Here are the keys for using both to stand out from the herd:

  • Create a custom background that expresses your brand or a color that exudes your brand attributes.
  • Add multimedia – images, videos, presentation PDFs and/or infographics – to the Summary and Experience sections of your profile
  • Update your headline to include not only your job title and company but also your promise – the results you deliver when you do what you do
  • Write a summary that’s one of a kind – including your passions and values. Give people who are checking you out an opportunity to get to know you beyond the accomplishments and credentials.

5. How can I use video to express my brand?

  • Make your video deliver value in 3 minutes or fewer.
  • Publish your video to YouTube using all the right keywords.
  • Publish your video using the update feature in LinkedIn.
  • Add relevant videos to the Summary or Experience sections of your LinkedIn profile.
  • Publicize your video by sharing it with your connections and via all relevant groups.

Delivering this webinar with Kim was a lot of fun – and the especially fun part was seeing how many career-minded professionals are investing time in their growth.

Source

https://www.forbes.com/sites/williamarruda/2018/09/16/the-top-5-faqs-from-the-forbes-personal-branding-webinar/