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3 Useful Things You Can Do With Your Domain Name To Brand Yourself

You’ve just purchased a new domain name. You’ve launched your website and you’re ready to get your name out there. The question is, what are some effective ways to make your new website name known? There is the option of paying for advertising, but if you don’t have a large marketing budget or backing from investors, that might not be feasible. Instead, by applying guerilla marketing tactics, you can spread the word about your new website for little to no cost at all. Check out these 3 useful things you can do with your domain name to brand yourself.

Write Your Domain Name On Your Resume

By placing your domain name prominently on your resume, you instantly stand out. It shows that you’ve taken the time to build a website and provide extra content for people to learn about you. It communicates that you are an authority in your field. Your resume details your skills and experience, and adding your domain name will help build the brand of “you.” Even if you don’t have a formal business to promote, you solidify the idea of [you + your expertise] in your readers’ minds.

Print New Business Cards

Similar to placing your domain name on your resume, you should also place your domain name on your business card. The more clever your domain name, the more memorable it will be for the people who you give it to. And it’s relatively cheap to print new business cards with your new domain name on them. Lifehacker wrote a helpful article about the five best business card printing sites, and how to choose the one that fits your needs. Whichever route you take, business cards are still a relevant way to make a first impression. Your domain name on your business card can provide tangible information for clients and helps prevent your brand from being forgotten.

Post On Social Media

Another low cost way to brand yourself is to make a quick post on social media with your new domain name in it. People will see it, re-tweet it, and share it even more, all without costing you anything. Since it’s already an online-channel, people will be able to click through to your website easily. It’s a great excuse to post something, and it’s newsworthy because you’re giving people a destination to go to, with great content and information that is valuable to them.

What are some non-conventional ways you are using your domain name to brand yourself? Mention @Porkbun to keep the discussion going. #sweetdomains

#AskGaryVee Episode 4: Personal Branding and Brett Favre

#AskGaryVee Episode 4: Personal Branding and Brett Favre

in terms of platform social media, is it better to self brand or establish a name brand? I go back and forth. – Diligent Leaders, that’s a solid question. I think it’s something everybody struggles with. Am I going to be Gary Vaynerchuck on social or am I going to be wine marketing man? Look […]

in terms of platform social media, is it better to self brand
or establish a name brand? I go back and forth. – Diligent Leaders, that’s a solid question. I think it’s something
everybody struggles with. Am I going to be Gary
Vaynerchuck on social or am I going to be wine marketing man? Look what happened there. That’s my answer. What happens if you evolve? Lot of people watching right now started off as marketing gurus but now sell carrot juice. One of the things I like
about being your name is that you can evolve with it. You’re looking at a guy who used to do a show where I drank wine and spit into the bucket and now I’m doing this show and I’ve been able to
do a seamless transition because the truth is many of us have different facets to our personalities and so I am on the camp of going with your name. It’s something that can stick with you. There’s consistency. You don’t have to rebrand. I didn’t have to change my Twitter profile form wine guy to ask guy.

how important is it that your significant other share your entrepreneurial vision? What was Lizzie’s impact on building your empire? – Blake, this is a great question. Decided to get your question on the show. First of all, Lizzie’s impact on my career is much more than I expected. I grew up and would hear […]

how important is it that
your significant other share your entrepreneurial vision? What was Lizzie’s impact
on building your empire? – Blake, this is a great question. Decided to get your question on the show. First of all, Lizzie’s impact on my career is much more than I expected. I grew up and would hear things like, behind every great man is a great woman. I’d be like psh. And not in a negative chauvinistic way but I was like, I’m hustling my face off. I’d be working every hour. And then you start growing and you mature and you become a man. Not a kid. And the truth is I’m
actually flabbergasted by the level of Liz’s impact on my career. Lizzie’s support and I mean utter 100 thousand percent support is a major factor. It gives me the head
space to be all in here at Vayner and doing my thing versus worrying about if
I’m five minutes late. I’m running late taping this right now. If I get home, it’s going…You know. It’s incredibly important in the fact if you prioritize your career. Curve ball. So it’s massively important
to give you head space to have as much freedom to execute on your vision professionally but the truth is when you fall in love with somebody, that person needs to take precedent over everything else and so at some level if you don’t have that, well, that just comes with
the consequences of love and that’s okay too. You may not be able to
hustle or work on it or work on it in a clear mind space and never give it 100 percent. I’m able to give 100 percent devotion to my businesses for enormous amounts of time every day because of Lizzie and the
way she rolls and supports. Some people can only put
73 percent of their time for a shorter period of time and they’re going to have limited success in comparison predicated
on their talent as well because talent is a variable. So it’s massively important for success but it’s not the only thing, is it?

– [Voiceover] Ryan asks, what’s the most common mistake you see founders make building a consumer focused business? Ry, there’s so many goddamn mistakes in building a consumer business but I will tell you the, you asked the question, I’m going to have to keep it real here as we do on #AskGaryVee show. The […]

– [Voiceover] Ryan asks, what’s the most common mistake you see founders make building a consumer focused business? Ry, there’s so many goddamn mistakes in building a consumer business but I will tell you the, you asked the question, I’m going to have to keep it real here as we do on #AskGaryVee show. The biggest mistake I see is that it is really hard to build a consumer app. The ability to beat out everybody else in the world and making something sticky that people care about is, I don’t know why I did that, is extremely difficult. And the biggest mistake I see, Ryan, is actually the fact that
people don’t have talent to actually execute a consumer product. The audacity. The audacity in the marketplace right now by the young and hungry and the old and hungry in thinking that I’m
going to make this app and it’s going to work is so ludicrous to me. It’s so stunning to me. You have people who’ve
been career students. You have people that have been career corporate America people and they think they are going to just come and start a product and understand the behavior
of the end consumer better than anybody else trying to scratch that itch for that specific product. That takes special talent. Nobody wakes up and is like, I’m going to be an NBA player today because it just makes sense to them but everybody right now is waking up and saying they’re going to be a consumer product innovator, inventor, co-founder and so the truth is the answer to your question straight up is lack of self-awareness that they’re not good enough to do it.

Marie asks, what’s the biggest lesson you’ve learned this year? Marie, that is a very simple question. By far the biggest question, biggest question, the biggest thing I learned and don’t edit it. I don’t edit here. Marie, the biggest thing I’ve learned this year hands down is that prioritizing my health is a really […]

Marie asks, what’s the biggest lesson
you’ve learned this year? Marie, that is a very simple question. By far the biggest question, biggest question, the biggest thing I learned and don’t edit it. I don’t edit here. Marie, the biggest thing
I’ve learned this year hands down is that prioritizing my health
is a really good idea. The fact that I am now going to the gym and eating healthy and I’m, what are we Tuesday? Is today Tuesday? So I’m 26 days in to
26 days of working out and times three. 78 healthy meals in a
row without cheating. The energy level is actually
down believe it or not because I was living on sugar but I just feel like a
totally different person. It was the absolute right decision for me. It’s changed my life. I’m heading in the right direction. I feel like a different person. I will be on this Earth longer for it barring crazy accident and I’m happy about that.

– [Voiceover] Daniel asks, what’s the best advice you can give salespeople in social media? D Gordon, what’s up my friend? Just want to give you one more shout out for the time we hung out years ago at your family’s business. I enjoyed it. Thanks for the question. Biggest piece of advice that I’m […]

– [Voiceover] Daniel asks, what’s the best advice
you can give salespeople in social media? D Gordon, what’s up my friend? Just want to give you one more shout out for the time we hung out years ago at your family’s business. I enjoyed it. Thanks for the question. Biggest piece of advice
that I’m willing to give to salespeople in this world is actually ironically the
jab, jab, jab, right hook. It’s cliche. I think you guys know
where I would go with is. The truth is everybody’s
trying to close too early. It’s just lack of patience. It’s not providing value. Why in the world am I doing this show? Is is that I missed the
limelight of a daily show? By the way, this will not be a daily show. Just to kill any lack of confusion. I’m going away in two
weeks with my family. Unlike WineLibraryTV days where I would tape 10 episodes. That will not be happening. You will be missing me
at the end of August but I will come back
with gusto in September. It’s because I want to provide value. It’s because I could be regurgitating the same old stuff that I
believe in, core principles, or I could go to this format and give you value on a daily basis on things that you’re looking for and so to me a couple things. One, understand Facebook dark posts. The segmentation is incredible. Two, Twitter search. You can pull people out one by one. Three, LinkedIn’s coming
soon with their product where you’ll be able to
focus based on titles so you can hit up every single person that’s a CFO of financial service company in their stream. That’s the hit up. Not spamming them in the mail on LinkedIn. So be tactical but understand the religion which is provide value upfront. How many of you who watch
this show provide value, put out stories, entertainment, free stuff, reply to people and aren’t just hitting up people who have more followers
or more exposure than you to try to get exposure yourself? How many of you are actually
trying to provide value? Thank you so much for
watching episode four

Source

http://askgaryveeshow.com/episode/askgaryvee-episode-4-personal-branding-and-brett-favre/

Personal Branding as an English as a Second Language Speaker

Do you use English in international business?

If you do, my guess is you want to sound damn good while you do it.

Of course, you do.

Here’s the thing though: speaking a language well and making an impact is about far more than your English.

Watch this video:

This was taken as part of a recent seminar I did with Hitomi Horiguchi about marketing called “Blogger meers YouTuber”.

One of the things many people asked me to show them how I make YouTube videos. This is the video I made.

The Business You are Really In

Regardless of what your “job” is, you are in the business of being YOU. The way you present yourself to the world is how you market and brand yourself. Your English–the words and phrases you use, your pronunciation and all that–is just one aspect of your personal brand.

An Extreme Example

This is an extreme example, but imagine a guy in a dirty, filthy suit. He’s got crap in his hair, dirt on his face and he stinks of piss. It doesn’t matter how eloquent his English is, how many fancy-sounding words he knows or how crisp his accent. He still stinks of piss and there’s no way you’ll want to do business with him. On the other hand, imagine someone who has everything else right–he’s clean, dressed well and smells, well, good. But his English is so bad you can barely understand what he’s saying… you probably still don’t want to do business with him. Your personal brand is the total of everything you present to the world.

Making Waves in the World of International Business

In 2018 I’ve got a new book coming out on the topic of speaking extraordinary English in the world of international business, with a particular focus on sales and personal branding.

Until then interested parties are encouraged to check out the recordings form an event I did last June.

Cheers,

Julian Northbrook
Language Punk. Wave Maker.

P.S. The Making Waves event included two sessions: “Breakthrough Business Communication Strategies” and my personal rules for life and business, “Into the Waves”. Click here for more information.

If you found “Personal Branding as an English as a Second Language Speaker” useful, share it:

    Is It Possible to Brand Yourself?

    Is It really possible for a small website, business, or non-profit to brand itself?Many of our clients here at are small organizations — entrepreneurs, bloggers, churches, ministries, and other non-profit organizations.

    They start realizing their need for a website, so they come to us for help.

    They view their website as a sort of online business card or brochure. But they feel overwhelmed by the task of actually using their website to brand their business or organization.

    Like most people, they think of a brand as a famous logo, such as McDonalds or Nike or Fox News. They feel that a gorgeous website, stunning colors, or flashy technology will help brand them to their customers. (They also get discouraged because it seems impossible to compete with “the big boys.”)

    So I’ve been thinking about this. Is it even possible for a tiny blog, website, or non-profit organization to effectively brand itself in the minds of its customers?

    My husband and I say, “Yes!” But first, we all need to start realizing what a brand really is.

    Your brand is not your logo.

    A logo is certainly an important thing. You want to have a consistent look and feel across all your publications, from your website to your business card to your letterhead to your Powerpoint presentations.

    But your logo is simply a tool you use to communicate your brand.

    This is why Kraig spends so much time on the phone with our clients before he starts to design a logo. He asks them questions such as:

    • What is your company’s purpose?
    • What are your goals?
    • Where do you see your company in 5 or 10 years?
    • Can you describe your ideal client?
    • What needs do your clients have?
    • How do your products and services meet those needs?
    • Who is your competition? How are they meeting client needs better than you? How is your company doing a better job?
    • What feeling or message do you wish your logo would communicate to your clients?

    Your brand portrays why you exist.

    Branding can only start when you have a firm grasp of

    • Why you exist
    • What problems your clients face
    • Why your solution is the best for your clients

    Once you know these things, then you need to constantly remind yourself of them.

    • Before you write a blog post, picture your client in your mind. Write to that specific person.
    • Before you design a business card, imagine the person you’re going to hand it to. What needs is he or she facing today?
    • Before you make a new product, determine the frustrations and anxieties the customer is having. Only include solutions in your product — nothing else.
    • Before you answer the phone, remember how you feel when you call a company. How would you want to be treated?
    • Before you respond to a customer complaint, ask yourself if you honestly delivered on your promises? If not, be prepared to make it right.

    As you allow your vision, mission, and purpose to permeate everything you do, your brand will begin to emerge. Naturally.

    As you get a firm grasp on who you are and whom you serve, your graphic and website designer will be better able to help you communicate your brand through your logo and website design.

    And your image will be unforgettable.

    Raleigh – Durham, NC Headshots and Personal Branding

    Headshots and Personal Branding in Raleigh – Durham, NC

    Whatever your career YOU are your brand. Showing off the best possible you is key in getting clients and growing your business. A professional corporate headshot is important for job hunting, your current career, online business presence or social media profiles. For an child actor or performer a professional headshot is your best marketing tool to get noticed by agents and not lost in a sea of photos.  Elevate your personal brand with magazine quality images. Visit our detailed Professional Portrait website at www.NCHeadshots.com.

    Studio Headshot Session

    30 minute session | 1 headshot file

    Quick and easy, studio mini sessions last 20-30 minutes and include one look/outfit on 1-2 backgrounds in the Raleigh studio. 15-20 edited proofs to choose from in an online gallery and one retouched headshot image file is included. Upgrade to a full session for multiple looks, a longer session & additional files.

    Location Headshot Mini Session

    45 minute session | 2 digital files

    On location headshot sessions last 30-45 minutes and include one look/outfit. 20-25 edited proofs are presented in an online gallery and 2 digital negatives of your choosing are included. Upgrade to a full session for multiple looks, a longer session or additional files.

    Modeling/Dating Portfolio

    1.5 hour session | Up to 3 looks
    6 digital files

    Sessions take place at select locations around the Raleigh-Durham area and last up to 1.5 hours. 45-50 edited proofs will be presented in an online gallery. 6 digital files of your choosing are included.

    Personal Branding Session

    2 hour session | Up to 3 looks
    25 digital files

    We will capture a combination of headshots, professional portraits and incidental images. 50-60 magazine quality images to choose from and 25 retouched digital files included. Additional upgrades: add a business partner, additional time or more final images.

    Since 2005 headshot photographer Season Moore has earned a reputation in Raleigh – Durham, North Carolina as the area’s premier corporate photographer. She specializes in flattering business headshots, actor and modeling portfolios for children and adults that are appealing to casting directors and agencies. Whether it’s in studio, downtown Raleigh or at your place of business I work to make you feel completely confident and at ease. After the session I will Tweet, Instagram, blog, link and share every tidbit I have learned along the way as a small business in a digital world.

    Headshot and Professional Image Details

    Season provides both on location sessions in the Raleigh – Durham area and contemporary studio photos in her Raleigh Studio. Her goal is to create comfortable working environment so that each and every person is relaxed, at ease and natural expressions come through. Using flattering light, angles and posing she will capture the best version of you. All photos include standard retouching (subtle removal of blemishes, under eye circles, wrinkles, etc). Extra retouching may incur additional fees.

    About Season Moore

    Andy Molinsky – Reach Personal Branding Interview Series


    REACH PERSONAL BRANDING INTERVIEW SERIES – March 2017

    REACH –

    A New Strategy to Help You Step Outside Your Comfort Zone, Rise to the Challenge and Build Confidence


    On March 23, 2017 William Arruda, founder of Reach Personal Branding, interviewed Andy Molinsky.

    – Do you feel comfortable delivering bad news?
    – Do you look forward to speaking in public?
    – Do you enjoy networking?
    – Is it easy for you to speak your mind and be assertive with friends and colleagues?

    If you answered no to any of these questions, Andy Molinsky’s new book can help. Andy has conducted research on managers, executives, entrepreneurs, doctors, police officers, salespeople, and countless others to examine the challenges of stepping outside your comfort zone and how you can successfully overcome these challenges.

    In this interview you will learn:

    • Why it’s so critical to learn to reach outside our comfort zones
    • How and why we avoid doing it
    • The critical psychological roadblocks we face when stepping outside our comfort zone
    • The multiple ways we avoid stepping outside our comfort zones
    • The 3 essential tools we need for successfully taking the leap

    http://traffic.libsyn.com/reachinterviewseries/AndyMolinskyReachInterview3.23.17.mp3

    Podcast: Play in new window | Download

    BIO: Andy Molinsky

    Andy Molinsky is a Professor of Organizational Behavior and Psychology at Brandeis University, and the author of the new book . Molinsky’s first book, Global Dexterity, received the Axiom Award for Best Business Book in International Business & Globalization and has been used widely in organizations around the world. He is a columnist for , a frequent contributor to Harvard Business Review and Psychology Today, and was recently named one of Linkedin’s Top Voices for 2016. Find out more at

    Download the handout for this interview:

    THANK YOU TO OUR SPONSOR:

    The International Coach Federation invites you to join the global coaching community at the intersection of coaching and potential for ICF Converge 2017. Join ICF August 24 – 26 in Washington, DC, USA for this dynamic, first-of-its-kind global event. Learn more and register today at .

    Ten Personal Branding Mistakes to Avoid

    I never liked the idea of a canned elevator speech for use in networking situations. I want people — including you — to be spontaneous and to respond in the moment when someone asks them “So, what do you do?” But I also understand that people feel better if they have a few words prepared ahead of time. They want to be able to answer the question “What kind of work do you do?” quickly and without stumbling. That’s a reasonable thing to aspire to. So, I help people compose elevator speeches all the time. (I make them promise not to recite the elevator speech as though they were reading a script, but to become so comfortable with it that the speech trips off the tongue.)

    Apart from face-to-face verbal branding, we’ve got to compose a LinkedIn headline, and we’ve got to brand ourselves in other places, too. If you chat in online forums or Yahoo!groups, you’ve got to be able to tell people what you do. When you update your resume, you need some kind of description of what you’ve done and what you’re looking to do next. Most people do that in the form of a resume Summary.

    So, what’s your resume Summary going to say? The Summary at the top of your resume may be the most critical part of the whole document, because it tells the reader what you think about your own career thus far, and what you’re aiming for. In any of these personal branding scenarios, you’re likely to veer in the direction of these ten unfortunate branding habits (on our list, below). Don’t do it! Once you learn how each of these branding tendencies is a less-than-sensational branding choice, and read our “here’s how to fix the branding problem” examples, perhaps you’ll find the task of branding yourself in words a bit easier. I hope so!

    No Brand at All
    Choosing no brand at all is the most common personal branding mistake that people make. Here’s what that sounds like:

    SOMEONE: So, what do you do?
    YOU: Oh, I’ve done a bunch of things. I write press releases, and I’ve been an Office Manager and an HR person at one point, too. I can do anything.

    If you have no brand, it means you don’t know where you’re going. Your no-brand branding is saying “I have a bunch of skills, and I hope someone can use some of them.” We need to do more work than that. We need to decide what we want to do next. Then, when someone asks “So, what do you do?” we can say “I’m looking for a Public Relations job” or “I’m looking for an HR job” or “I’m a writer, and I’ve had a lot of fun writing press releases as well as HR materials for employees. I love communicating in writing – that’s my thing.”

    We need to create a frame that encompasses our past experience and whatever we’ve decided we want to do next. (We can have more than one direction, for a job search for instance, but in any given networking conversation, we’ll only pull out one elevator speech. That’s why we need to ask a few questions of our conversational partner before dumping our speech on him or her. Without learning something about the person we’re speaking to, we won’t know which variation of our elevator speech to use!).

    Brand is Too Broad
    It’s not a good idea to try to be all things to all people, branding-wise. Here’s how that sounds:

    SOMEONE: So, what do you do professionally?
    YOU: I’m a Marketing person. I also do PR, and a little bit of Sales and Operations. Also Customer Service.

    It is normal to want to squeeze everything you’ve ever done into the short “Who am I?” intro, but it’s not a good idea. It’s almost like having no brand at all, because people don’t know what to do with the information you’re giving them when it’s too broad. They need to be able to mentally roll through the Rolodex in their heads and think about people they know who might be looking for someone with your skill set. Unless you’re looking to be the number two hire in a fledgling startup, a too-broad functional brand is a liability, not an asset. (If you were looking to be the number two hire in a startup, you wouldn’t say “I do Sales and Marketing and Operations.” You’d say, “I’m the person who comes into a startup very early and pulls together the back-office and customer-facing infrastructure, lands the first customers and gets the business up and running.”)

    Branding for Industries We Don’t Care About
    Here’s another personal-branding mistake people make. They make this one in their LinkedIn profiles and their resumes every day. They tell us (the reader of the resume or LinkedIn profile, or the person hearing their elevator speech for the first time) the industries they’ve worked in, although they may not be an industry-specific player. Why would we do that? It’s because we’ve been trained to list our industries, as though they’re important to our branding, even when they’re not! Here’s what this personal branding mistake looks like on paper:

    Results-oriented PR professional with experience in Telecom, Legal Services and Apparel industries.

    Here’s the problem: this is a PR person. A PR person could work in any industry. If you don’t care about working specifically in telecom, law or apparel again, why would you make that part of your brand? All you’re going to do with this branding is push non-telecom/non-legal/non-apparel people away from you. That’s a terrible branding move! If you do care about staying in a certain industry (not sure why you would) then tell us which industry you’re focused on — and I’m sure in that case it won’t be the random mix of telecom, legal and apparel. Those just happen to be the employers who’ve hired you earlier in your career. Don’t let their industries define your future trajectory!

    Using Corporatespeak Boilerplate
    Lots of people use boring, robotic corporatespeak language to brand themselves. They say and write things like:

    “End-to-end problem-solver who provides bottom-line results.”

    Oh, please! This is a horrible brand. What does it mean? This kind of general filler language impresses no one, because it’s nearly content-free. All the boilerplate language we’ve been taught to use in our resumes can only hurt us. It screams “I am afraid to actually talk about myself, so I’ll use all the done-to-death resume words and phrases I’ve heard a million times before.” Here’s a list (it could be much longer, if space allowed) of words and phrases to take out of your resume, your LinkedIn profile and your brain right now:

    Results-oriented professional
    Bottom-line orientation
    Meets or exceeds expectations
    Managing cross-functional teams
    Proven track record of success
    Progressively more responsible positions
    Motivated self-starter

    Your brand will be stronger – and will sound like it belongs to a living person – when you use a human voice in your branding, and leave the robot language out of it.

    Praising Ourselves
    Here’s another common personal branding mistake. People say, or write “I’m a sales guru” or “I’m the best marketer in Connecticut.” This is grasp-y and grovelly. It’s horrible personal branding, because it says “I have to praise myself, in a lame attempt to get you to think I’m good at what I do.” Ever notice that the people who really are gurus and mavens, never brand themselves that way? We don’t need to praise ourselves in our branding. What we can do instead is tell the reader or listener what we love to do – what we care about. That’s a lot more interesting for the reader or listener than hearing us trumpet our own fabulousness.

    Listing The Tasks We’ve Performed
    People are complex. They are multi-faceted. We don’t want to brand ourselves by listing the things we’ve done in our past jobs, or the things we intend to do at future jobs. Here’s what it looks like when people do that:

    I type, answer the phone, handle customer service calls, set up databases, create reports and schedule appointments.

    When we offer lists of tasks and duties, we minimize our own accomplishments. If we can get a little altitude on our own careers, we can say:

    “I’m an Office Manager who loves to keep an overbooked CEO sane, and serve as the air-traffic controller for a busy office.”

    Now we see this Office Manager in action. We see that s/he understands what the job entails and has fun talking about. This job-seeker is using imagery (‘air traffic controller”) in her branding — s/he could even use it in his or her LinkedIn headline. This person isn’t listing the tasks that he or she has performed — rather, s/he’s giving us a feel for how s/he perceives the job. Much stronger branding!

    Making Your Brand About the Trophies
    Very smart and accomplished people fall victim to this branding mishap all the time. They say things like

    Accomplished Marketer with an MBA and Director-level experience in top aerospace firms.

    This is an unfortunate branding move, because it says “Look! Look at my MBA! A real university conferred that on me – I must be awesome, right?” We don’t want to send that message. If you have an MBA, that’s great. Your MBA doesn’t make you powerful. If you are awesome, it’s because you are an amazing person. You don’t need to hold the MBA or the director-level experience or a certification or any other trophy — that is, an honor or accolade conferred by some other person or body – to make you fabulous. You can talk in your branding about why you do what you do, or how you do it. That shows the reader that you have a passion for your work. In that case, you’re not saying “Look at the awards I’ve won, and the diplomas I’ve received!” You’re saying “I am me. I’m not perfect for every employer or every client, but I have a take on my work which is mine alone. It works for some people. Maybe you are one of them.”

    Branding is something that pulls the right people closer to you and pushes the rest of them away. We don’t need to go to the consulting or job-search marketplace with the message “Please find me acceptable.” Your branding task is to decide which audiences you want to reach, and then to create a brand that speaks to those audiences — not to every person alive on the planet.

    Making Your Brand About the Years of Experience

    If I had a nickel for every LinkedIn profile I’ve read that says “Seven years of experience in Marketing, and four in Product Management” I’d be a rich person. This is an awful way to brand yourself. The time that has elapsed as you’ve performed your various assignments is the least important thing about those gigs. We want to tell people how you think, how you view the world and how you’ve made a difference for your past employers and clients. We want them to know what gets you excited. Who cares how many years you’ve spent in one industry or function, or another? That is not as significant as what you’ve accomplished in your career so far.

    Avoiding the Word “I” in Your Branding
    This isn’t likely to trip you up in your face-to-face conversations, but most of us have been trained to avoid using the word “I” in our resume and LinkedIn branding, and that is a crazy thing to do. After all, these documents are about you. Of course you’ll use the word “I!” If you don’t, you’ll sound like a robot — and that’s what we are trying to avoid. Instead of “Results-oriented professional” you can say “I’m a Marketer who loves to conduct as much research as it takes to convert product, pricing and promotion decisions from trial balloons to low-risk exercises.” You’re telling us how you approach your job. You can use “I” in the Summary of your resume, and again in the bullets that describe your accomplishments (not tasks and duties!) for the jobs you’ve held.

    Meandering
    The last personal branding mistake on our list is one that often befalls people who have thought about their personal branding. They want to tell the reader or listener something about how they operate, so they write something like this:

    Ever since childhood, I’ve been fascinated by complex problems and the range of solutions that might apply. I love to solve Sudoku and logic puzzles, and find customer-relationship and process-improvement conundrums especially satisfying.

    People send me resumes and LinkedIn profile urls with this kind of language in them every day. I love the fact that the writer is trying to get him- or herself across on the page. The problem here is that we don’t get the punchline. We’re not willing to keep reading, because we don’t have a frame for the conversation. Okay, you love puzzles — are you an engineer? We need that information right up front. We’re not willing to wait for it.

    If you’re saying that you’re a problem-solver but you don’t know whether you want to be in IT or Sales, we can’t help you. It is frustrating for the reader to encounter this kind of branding. It tells us something about the interior life of the writer – but nothing that we, as a listener or reader, can grab hold of as we think about the person in front of us and opportunities we may have heard about. Imagine that you met someone in a social setting — a block party, for instance. Imagine that you asked the person “So, tell me what you do in the daytime” and your new acquaintance said “I’m a problem-solver” or something else just as general. You’d think “Really? Six-month-old babies solve problems. What does that tell me?”

    What To Do Instead: Examples of Personal Brands That Work
    Here are a few examples of personal branding statements that bring the person across on the page; use a human voice; get the chosen direction out right away; don’t stoop to praise the author; and aren’t meandering:

    I came up through the Accounting ranks and switched to Sales mid-career; now, I manage Fortune 50 account relationships for enterprise software vendors, helping my clients make smart strategic decisions about automating their internal processes (and maximizing their IT investments, hard and soft).

    I’m a CFO focused on startups, who’s closed funding rounds for my last three employers and built flexible finance and accounting systems that supported our rapid growth on modest back-office budgets. I love mentoring up-and-comers and to be involved in the product mix, marketing strategy and production decisions.

    As a kid I dug for dinosaur bones in the back yard (if indeed there were ever dinosaurs in Baltimore). Now I dig for hard-to-find business information as a research librarian in Fortune 500 companies, specializing in international law and commerce regulations.

    I write training materials and scripts for call-center agents, and deliver stand-up and online training to newbie reps as they build their confidence and skills handling simple or tricky customer calls. I love to construct nimble call-escalation processes and make the call center reps an extension of the Sales department, turning customer-service interactions into new opportunities to sell our products.

    Personal branding isn’t something most of us learn in school, but it isn’t rocket science either. We can get good at telling our story verbally or on paper. Try it!

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    Personal Branding: Becoming Known Well

    Archetypal Branding: Personal Branding

    A clear archetypal identity, not only for the product, but for the company, acts as the ‘strange attractor” that allows an orderly pattern to emerge even in chaotic conditions…. The growing consensus in organizational literature today is that the equivalent of the strange attractor in a company is its values—not necessarily its stated values, but its real values. We would add to this the understanding that foundational to these values is an archetype that defines them. Therefore, it is the archetypal structure of an organization that keeps it from spinning out of control or running out of gas.

    Personal Branding: Becoming Known Well

    As humans, we all long to be known and valued for who we really are—to be ourselves and to be appreciated for what is most unique and essential about us. Such recognition is especially critical when it comes to our working lives, where a huge percentage of our success and satisfaction is bound. But most of don’t how to define and shape an identity that helps other people understand why we matter—or how to let others know what’s best and most distinctive about us in the working world and through the businesses where we spend most of our time. That’s where an archetypal approach to “personal branding” comes in.

    All of us find certain characters more fascinating, more admirable—more like us or not like us—than others. The characters we relate to most give us significant clues about our own strengths and values, the passion and purpose that defines who we are at our best, and the meaning and motivation that fuels the great things we’re able to do. When we understand and convey what’s best about ourselves through an archetypal lens, we ultimately can express the kind of zeal that demands attention. Just think about these well-known examples of people who conjure a great archetypal storyline:

    • Steve Jobs, whose Revolutionary drive to think differently has become his legacy
    • Oprah Winfrey, an accessible Sage who sees her TV network as the world’s largest classroom
    • Richard Branson, an Explorer whose insatiable appetite for new ground has led him to start nearly 200 companies under the Virgin Group brand

    Personal branding isn’t exclusively the terrain of the rich and famous, though. It’s possible for any one of us who becomes consciously intentional about how we’re perceived; where we focus our energy and attention; the stances we take; the beliefs we allow to fuel our behaviors—and the many other things we say and do that ultimately create a persona that others can see and feel. The key to shaping our own personal brands and professional identities is to understand which archetypal characters and plotlines best personify our purpose and promise, and make conscious choices about how we show up in response.